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California steps up efforts to combat retail crime during the holiday shopping season ~ California

Shoppers across California may be noticing an increased law enforcement presence in and around malls across the state. Work has been done to stop robberies and other brazen forms of retail theft. “It’s a lucrative business and there’s a big resale market,” said California Highway Patrol Captain Jason Daughrity, who helps oversee the state’s Organized Retail Crime Task Force. Daughrity said the increased law enforcement presence includes designated and visible patrols around malls, undercover operations and patrol of busy shopping areas with planes. The recent spike in organized retail thefts across California has prompted responders to expand the task force’s reach into the Sacramento and Fresno areas. In 2022 alone, the California Highway Patrol has been involved in 300 investigations, arresting 300 suspects and recovering $7 million worth of stolen goods, according to Daughrity. Established in 2018, the task force has been involved in a total of 1,296 investigations, arresting 645 suspects and recovering more than 200,000 items totaling $26 million.” There are coordinated events that you don’t see that much calculated and very measured are ed and these are also means through which retailers are feeling serious repercussions,” Daughrity said. High-end sporting goods like Lululemon are among the products often targeted by criminals. “It has tremendous resale and a strong market for it,” Daughrity said. He noted that other commonly stolen goods include power tools, small electronics and personal care items such as razor blades, shampoo, shaving cream and medicines. For the more expensive goods, a series of new state laws will make it harder for criminals to recover stolen items to resell online. These laws are scheduled to come into force in January. In the Z Meanwhile, Daughrity said, law enforcement and retailers are working together on investigations. “The strongest thing law enforcement has out of any weapon is communication,” he said. The task force is part of a broader campaign by Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration against organized retail theft. Those efforts include providing $255 million in grants to local law enforcement over the next three years to fight retail theft and another $30 million to help prosecutors across the state track the suspects involved.

Shoppers across California may be noticing an increased law enforcement presence in and around malls across the state. Work has been done to stop robberies and other brazen forms of retail theft.

“It’s a lucrative business and there’s a big market for resale,” said Jason Daughrity, a California Highway Patrol captain who oversees the state’s Organized Retail Crime Task Force.

Daughrity said the increased law enforcement presence includes marked and visible patrols around malls, covert operations and aircraft surveillance of high-traffic shopping areas.

The recent surge in organized retail theft across California prompted the task force’s reach to be expanded to the Sacramento and Fresno areas. In 2022 alone, Daughrity said the California Highway Patrol has been involved in 300 investigations, arresting 300 suspects and recovering $7 million worth of stolen property.

Established in 2018, the task force has been involved in a total of 1,296 investigations, arresting 645 suspects and seizing more than 200,000 items totaling $26 million.

“There are coordinated events that you don’t see that are very calculated and very measured, and these are also means through which retailers are making a serious impact,” Daughrity said.

High-end sporting goods like Lululemon are among the products often targeted by criminals.

“It’s got tremendous resale and a strong market for it,” Daughrity said.

He noted that other commonly stolen goods are power tools, small electronics, and personal care items such as razor blades, shampoo, shaving cream, and medicines.

For the more expensive goods, a new set of state laws will make it harder for criminals to resell stolen items online. These laws are scheduled to come into force in January.

In the meantime, Daughrity said law enforcement and retailers are working together on investigations.

“The strongest thing law enforcement has out of any weapon is communication,” he said.

The task force is part of a broader campaign by Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration against organized retail theft. Those efforts include providing $255 million in grants to local law enforcement over the next three years to fight retail theft and another $30 million to help prosecutors across the state track the suspects involved.

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